Thin and Chewy Toffee Bits Cookies

Delightfully chewy, these delicious toffee cookies are soft and buttery with that signature burnt caramel/toffee taste that is irresistible!

Stack of toffee cookies on wood cutting board with one cookie broken in half.

I have a brother. His name is Jed (Jedediah, actually). He’s 14 months younger than me and we were the best of buddies growing up. As semi-adults we went on an epic backpacking trip in Korea together, ate some really gnarly stuff, and we also overlapped several years at college, which was super fun.

For me.

Jed still teases me that he’s surprised he ever actually got married, dated at all, or even had a semblance of a social life because I was so quick to give the protective stink eye to the girls he liked that I didn’t like. And I didn’t like many of them.

Anyway, he ended up finding the sweetest wife (I approved), they have five kids, he’s a busy ER doctor in Montana who still wrecks on his mountain bike regularly resulting in lectures from his older/wiser/smarter sister, and why am I telling you all this? Because what I really want to say is:

Jed happens to love cookies even more than I do (I guess I can’t be the best sibling at everything), and these chewy toffee cookies are his favorite. His favorite. Or in other words, take it from one guy (and his sister) who love cookies more than life and make these soon.

If you are in to delightfully thin and chewy cookies, this recipe is for you.

Also, if you are in to toffee in any way shape or form, these cookies are for you.

And finally, if you just love cookies and want another stellar, delicious version on the ol’ drop cookie, these cookies are for you.

Sometimes thick and chewy and soft and puffy cookies are where it’s at. But there’s something about a thin and chewy cookie that is absolutely irresistible at times.

I usually use the plain toffee bits that come in a package by the chocolate chips. But the chocolate covered toffee bits are amazing in these cookies (obviously).

And I also won’t fire you if you decide to dump in some mini chocolate chips with the toffee pieces either.

Stack of toffee cookies on wood cutting board.

Because these cookie are meant to be on the thin side, the variable of oven temperature is really important to dial in. All ovens (unfortunately) bake differently, and oven temperatures (and most oven thermometers) are rarely accurate, so it helps to get to know your oven and how it bakes.

It might sound a little fussy and a bit nerdy (welcome to my happily nerdy world), but it never hurts to bake one cookie alone in the preheated oven at first and then evaluate where you need the temperature to go from there. Many times cookies that are flattening/spreading just need baking temperature tweaked a bit.

Tip #1: These toffee cookies are meant to be thin and chewy; baking them at 375 degrees keeps them this way without them flattening too much. If you notice that your oven bakes hot and your cookies are getting overdone at this temperature, decrease the oven temp to 350 degrees.

Tip #2: If you have a convection bake feature on your oven, bake on 325 or 350 convection (choose the lesser temperature if your oven tends to bake hot).

Tip #3: If you want a slightly thicker, puffier cookie, add another 1/4 to 1/3 cup of flour to the cookie dough.

While you may never be able to quite surpass my brother’s love for these delicious little toffee cookies, I hope they become a fast favorite!

P.S. Here are a few of my other favorite thin and chewy cookie recipes:
Thin and Chewy Butterfinger Cookies
Soft Chocolate Drop Cookies
Soft and Chewy EASY Sugar Cookies

One Year Ago: Pumpkin Cream Cheese Muffins
Two Years Ago: Double Chocolate Chunk Muffins
Three Years Ago: White Bean Chicken Chili
Four Years Ago: Classic Slow Cooker Chili
Five Years Ago: White Texas Sheet Cake

Thin and Chewy Toffee Cookies

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Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup (6 ounces, 12 tablespoons) butter, softened to cool room temperature
  • 3/4 cup (5.5 ounces) granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup (5.5 ounces) packed light brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 3/4 cups (13.75 ounces) all-purpose flour (see note!)
  • 1 1/2 to 2 cups  (8 to 10 ounces) toffee bits (or chocolate covered toffee bits)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F (see note!). Line two large rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. Lightly grease with cooking spray and set aside.
  2. In a large bowl with a handheld electric mixer or in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar, baking soda and salt. Mix until well combined, 1-2 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.
  3. Add the vanilla and eggs and mix until the batter is light and fluffy, 1-2 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.
  4. Add the flour and toffee bits and mix until no dry streaks remain.
  5. Scoop the cookie dough into heaping tablespoons (I use my #40 cookie scoop) and roll into balls. Place about 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheets and bake for 10-11 minutes until edges are set and very slightly golden – the middles will still be soft for a chewy cookie (bake longer for a crispier cookie).
  6. Let the cookies rest for a minute or two on the baking sheets before removing to a wire rack to cool completely.

Notes:

These cookies are meant to be thin and chewy and baking them at 375 degrees keeps them this way without them flattening too much. If your oven bakes hot and your cookies are getting overdone at this temperature, decrease to 350 degrees. If you have a convection bake feature on your oven, bake on 325 or 350 convection (choose the lesser temperature if your oven tends to bake hot). 

It might sound a little fussy, but it never hurts to bake one cookie alone in the preheated oven to start and then evaluate where you need the temperature to go from there. Many times cookies that are flattening/spreading just need the correct baking temperature. All ovens (unfortunately) bake differently and oven temperatures are rarely accurate, so it helps to get to know your oven and how it bakes. 

If you want a slightly thicker cookie, add another 1/4 to 1/3 cup of flour to the cookie dough. 

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Recipe Source: from Mel’s Kitchen Cafe (originally from my sister-in-law, Erin W., I’ve adapted the recipe a bit to be slightly more buttery and chewier)